August 7, 2022

5 things to do this weekend, including a poetry reading and a pop-up shop


The snow is so beautiful when it is just starting to cover the ground, but after it falls it is dangerous. The days of February are gloomy and the urge to go out has diminished, at least for me. So this week, I’m tilting the scales towards virtual events. Of course, that means the one that requires leaving home is worth it!

Thursday February 18

The thing about poetry is that a few words can mean so much. I love poetry readings and conversations for the invaluable insight and knowledge I gain. This Thursday, Honorée Fanonne Jeffers will be in conversation with Malcolm Tariq, who launched the series “Poetry as Protest” on June 17th. Jeffers wears many hats – she is a poet, essayist, scholar, English teacher, and author of “The Age of Phillis”. She wrote the book after fifteen years of archival research into the life of Phillis Wheatley, a daring black woman – so you’re bound to learn something new about political upheaval and the transatlantic slave trade.


Thursday February 18

Is a list of 5 things really a complete list without music? I do not think so! In honor of Black History Month, the Black Student Union at the New England Conservatory hosted a series of concerts and events. They present a live concert by the group Trio Gaia, with violinist Grant Houston, pianist Andrew Barnwell and cellist Yi-Mei Templeman. Trio Gaia will perform “Five Negro Melodies for Piano Trio”, composed by Samuel Coleridge-Taylor at the beginning of the 20th century. Their performance will be followed by another captivating group made up of musicians Geneva Lewis, Maria Loudenitch, Zhanbo Zheng and Gabriel Martins.


Saturday February 20

Two Harvard students, Maeve Miller and Adam Sella, will take a deep dive into specific examples of photography that show how the medium helped promote ideas of racial justice during the Civil War era. This virtual tour will feature two examples, an 1864 photograph of a slave boy and a portrait of Frederick Douglass. Student virtual tours are ongoing and offer viewers a new perspective on the Harvard Art Museum collections.

The talk will focus on two 19th century business cards, “Freedom’s Banner. Charley, A Slave Boy from New Orleans”, by photographer Charles Paxson and one featuring Frederick Douglass by an unknown artist. (Courtesy of Harvard Art Museums.)

Saturday February 20

Every Saturday until March 6, the Pop Up Spread Love Collective will be operational at the South Bay Plaza in Dorchester. This pop-up is a rotation of local black-owned small businesses. My goal this year has been to support more small businesses, and what better way than to go shopping in a pop-up like this? My weak point will always be the earrings and body care, which both will have covered and much more! If you get by, that should be why!


Saturday February 20

A play written and performed by Dorchester natives will be presented digitally by Greater Joy Production at the Old Colony History Museum in Taunton. (A limited number of in-person tickets are sold out, but virtual seats are available.) “The Toby Gilmore Story” by playwright Stephen Sampson tells the story of a man who became a local hero of the Revolutionary War after to have been enslaved.